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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 135 (some duplicates have been removed)
long people came here to honor the legacy of dr. martin luther king, jr. >> reporter: hundreds of people boarded cal train for the freedom train from san jose to san francisco. it commemorates the alabama civil civil rights march. >> this is for all americans. to get out and enjoy this day and to celebrate and remember the struggles that we all have been through. [ singing ] >> reporter: hundreds of people join said them for a mile and a half march to the gardens. >> celebrating dr. king and celebrating community. that is important. >> reporter: more than a thousand people attended prayer services services and presentations on the life of dr. king. she knew and marched with dr. king. >> very, very nice. he was a wonderful person. wonderful person. non-violent. turning of the cheek. >> reporter: she was one of many african americans turned away that voting both. joining a dangerous protest march. she marched with dr. king on the civil rights march. >> very, very scary and a memorable experience that just doesn't go away. >> reporter: many people said a lot changed but more needs
at the national. >> nearly 50 years after the march on washington, our work, dr. king's work, it is not yet complete. we gather here at the moment of great challenge and great change. in the first decade of this new century, we have been tested by war and by tragedy, economic crisis and its aftermath that has left millions out of work in poverty on the rise and millions more to struggle to get by. indeed, even before this crisis struck, we have entered a decade of rising inequality and stagnant wages, and too many troubled never across the country the conditions of our poor citizens appear a little changed from what existed 50 years ago. neighborhoods with underfunded schools and broken down slums, inadequate health care, constant violence, neighborhoods in which to many young people grow up with little hope and peace prospects for the future. >> president obama speaking in 2011 at the dedication of the martin luther king monument on the national mall in washington, d.c. journalist, author tavis smiley has spent the past year criss- crossing the country with activist and professor cornell w
, once used by the late dr. martin luther king, flown from atlanta to d.c., hand delivered for tomorrow's ceremony. just how significant are the bibles used during inauguration ceremonies? and a story that weighs in. >>> plus, predicting that the president's second-term poll slice fail. you won't believe the number of folks who say that. we are talking the left and the right. next. so...how'd it go? well, dad, i spent my childhood living with monks learning the art of dealmaking. you've mastered monkey-style kung fu? no. priceline is different now. you don't even have to bid. master hahn taught you all that? oh, and he says to say (translated from cantonese) "you still owe him five bucks." your accent needs a little work. see lioutdoors, or in.ight. transitions® lenses automatically filter just the right amount of light. so you see everything the way it's meant to be seen. maybe even a little better. visit your eyecare professional today to ask about our newest lenses, transitions vantage and transitions xtractive lenses. experience life well lit. ask which transitions adaptive lens is
of service. [ cheers and applause ] >> and when he signed the bill, he reminded us of what dr. king often called life's most persistent and urgent question. what are you doing for others? and in my family, the only wrong answer to that question is nothing. >> chelsea clinton there speaking at the national day of service. monday isn't just inauguration day. also happens to be martin luther king jr. day. and we'll hear from his daughter bernice and find out why she says president obama's second term is actually even more important than the first one. >>> for 29-year-old pushp pushpa basnit, 2013 fleas begins on a high note. she was named cnn hero of the year for her work providing a home for children of incarcerated parents in nepal. i sat down with her after the big moment. how do you feel? you've just won. >> i think i'm dreaming. it's a big honor for me. i will never forget this night in my life. >> what was going through your mind when you were walking up on stage? >> we all are winners, definitely. i've seen my dream come true. thank you very much. i'm still -- definitely this is going
. the "i am a man" part of the memphis sanitation workers strike when dr. king was assassinated. talk to me about that piece. >> it's a text painting by an artist who works with just like that sign that we know so well from the iconic protests. he transforms that into art recognizing that we look at language as a visual thing as well when we take in art. the past is refigured in the present moment. we bring forward the king moment. more importantly, as you mentioned, the memphis sanitation workers strike moment thinking of how we got to where we are. >> it says labor and race and identity. >> yes, it does. >> it's linked to king. it's clearly male, i am a man, it's also, i am human. >> that's right. it's under lined. i am a man. there is that emphasis of what it means to stand tall and be recognized from within and saying i want to be recognized in that way. >> there's a truism that we campaign in poetry and govern many pros. how much of a poet has the president managed to be and how much might you imagine to be a poet into the second term? >> i think, certainly, the president would be the
of what dr. king often called life's most persistent and urgent question -- what are you doing for others? and in my family, the only wrong answer to that question is nothing. but there are as many right answers as there are people in this tent today and people in our country. eva spoke about how her parents inspired her. my parents certainly inspire me every day. but today, when i engaged in a service project with my husband mark, i will be thinking about my grandmother dorothy who started giving back when she was a child. she volunteered in her local school, helping to tutor migrant workers, farm children in southern california, in reading in english and writing. as she got older and had her own children, she provided school trips. she always wanted to cook an extra lunch for someone whose parents could not provide that for them. when she got older still, her children, including my mom, had left the hall. she became a big sister to mentor young girls like her who had been neglected and abused as a child. when she got older still and she could not do that any longer, she would knit cloth
miles long, about the same distance of the 1965 voting rights march by dr. king and other activists in alabama. speakers were on board to talk about dr. king's impact on today's world. >> had it not been for him making the steps he made, fighting for us, i don't feel like this would be possible. we wouldn't have the freedom we have now. >> this was the 29th year for the freedom train organized by the m.l.k. association of the santa clara valley. >>> cbs 5 reporter kristin ayers spent time with a local civil rights pioneer. >> reporter: when 90-year-old george carol tells me about his life from student to soldier -- >> i drafted into the army, served in world war ii. >> reporter: to judge and political leader in richmond, california, he talks as if it happened yesterday. >> i was appointed to the municipal court. >> reporter: for his wife janey and family, it's a surprising moment of clarity, but moments later carroll repeats the facts as if he never said then. >> appointed to the bench by the governor, municipal court, then superior court. >> rep
, the inauguration also comes on the federal holiday in honor of dr. martin luther king, jr., who delivered his "i have a dream" speech 50 years ago, not far from here at the lincoln memorial. later in our special coverage, we will air excerpts of some of dr. king's less often played speeches, including "beyond vietnam." why he opposed the war in vietnam. but first, we turn to some of the voices of hope and resistance from sunday night's piece ball. not affiliated with any political party, the celebration at the mead center for american theater paid tribute to the continuing struggle for peace and justice here in the united states and throughout the world. we begin with naacp president benjamin jealoin. >> this is the place to be tonight. the challenge for our country was never to see the day when a person of color would be president, know the challenge for our country was to ensure that it would be safe for it to happen again and again. we knew it could be condoleezza rice. it could be colin powell. but we got barack obama. we got a man who was a product of a progressive movement. as we stand her
honor dr. martin luther king jr., whose holiday is on monday. >> then tomorrow president obama and vice president biden are officially sworn in for their second terms. the inaugural ceremonies, the public ceremonies, will take place monday and will include performances by beyonce, james taylor, and kelly clarkson. >> it's going to be a show. and crews are still putting together the preparations for monday's inauguration. we have team coverage starting with tom sherwood who's at the national mall. tom, we don't get to see you on many saturdays. this must be something special. >> reporter: no, i usually have something else to do on saturday, but this is pretty cool down here. this is the largest tent behind me over here ever erected on the national mall. it's for the national day of service. about 100 different organizations are represented here today. they range from local to national and community groups. also here are military and veterans groups, economic development, education, health care, you name it. it's all part of the national day of service for the obama inaugural. something i
. not far from where dr. martin luther king gave his historic "i have a dream" speech back in 1963 right here on the national mall. in just moments from now i'll be joined by clarence jones. he is a close, personal friend of mlk and a contributor on that very speech. and he will tell us what he wants to see from president obama's speech, his inaugural speech coming up on monday. >>> let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. i've always had to keep my eye on her... but, i didn't always watch out for myself. with so much noise about health care... i tuned it all out. with unitedhealthcare, i get information that matters... my individual health profile. not random statistics. they even reward me for addressing my health risks. so i'm doing fine... but she's still going to give me a heart attack. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. how did i know? well, i didn't really. see, i figured low testosterone would decrease my sex drive... but when i started losing energy and
of the president talking about a conversations you had with dr. martin luther king and of course tomorrow is mlk day. it couldn't be a more appropriate day. i'm sure you would feel for barack obama's second inauguration. but in those conversations with martin luther king, he felt there may be an african-american president, the first black president in the next 40 years. you didn't think it would happen in your lifetime. >> it's -- that's true. i'm so excited. i'm so happy about my country. that we are growing up. >> and how do you think the president -- >> we are moving beyond ignorance. >> right. how do you think. >> sorry? >> how do you think he's done, president obama, in the first term and what would you like him to do more of in his second term? >> well, i think he's done the best he could. i think that there were number of people who as soon as he was elected put their feet down in -- their heels in to the earth and said, no matter what he does, no matter how good he is, i will not support him. i will resist his attempts to make our country better. i think that he was -- i think he was sur
holiday honorering dr. martin luther king president obama will take the oath again, make his inaugural address, and ride in the inaugural parade. four years ago an estimated 1.8 million people came to tin august rags. this year organizers expect less than half that number. >> the first inauguration was a path-breaking historic moment. expectations are much lowered for the second inaugural. >> reporter: but the president hopes to make his second term historic. his staff says he'll be far more aggressive as he takes on the republicans in the house over spending, gun control immigration, and tax reform. >> he's now got to be the guy in charge, the guy who inspires the american people, and who gets them behind his principles and his policies. >> reporter: but this weekend as he takes the oath on bibles which belonged to president lincoln and dr. king president obama wants to remind the nation of its traditions. >> the inauguration reminds us of the role that we have as fellow citizens in promoting a common good. >> reporter: now today is a day of service in honor of
times of struggle and sacrifice. >> dr. king knocked down walls, and he was scarred and stabbed and killed and jailed. barack obama crossed bridges from the rocks knocked down from the walls. >> reporter: civil rights lieders, actor jamie foxx joined in the wreath laying. >> i think it's a great day, an intersection of history where you have the president, who is the first black president, being inaugurated for the second time on dr. king holiday. >> reporter: parents brought their children to be part of it, visitors took pictures to remember this day. gail punch came from dallas, texas, to be here. >> i get medicare, medicaid. i was a precinct chair. i have problems walking, but i wouldn't let nothing stop me. >> reporter: and you don't have to let anything stop you either. even if you don't have a ticket, you can come down to the mall and stand between 4th and 14th streets. this is the kind ever view you would get. there are also wide screen tvs. you might decide the best place to watch it all is right here on tv. that's the latest live from the mall. back to you, jim. >> you
short years ago, that dr. king stood on the steps of the lincoln memorial and said i have a dream. >> of course, this was actually the fourth time that president obama has taken the oath of office. let's bring in our panel, van jones, cnn contributor who served as president obama's green jobs adviser in 2009. sally quinn, margaret hoover, republican consultant, cornell belcher, democratic strategist who served as a pollster for president obama's 2012 re-election team. i wonder how you think this anniversary, this martin luther king day, informed and was infused throughout president obama's remarks today. >> i'll go back to even when he was senator obama. he always talked about, he also understood the gravity and talked about, i stand on the shoulders of the great men and women of the civil rights era who made this possible. even early on, many of the civil rights leaders early on in the primary process were with hillary clinton and it took a while for them to get used to obama and sort of trust him and know who he was. and he used a lot of that conversation saying, look, because o
's bible and the bible of dr. king as well on inauguration ceremony. and i always think of that as sort of, a cycle, right, in a way, a virtuous cycle, martin luther king jr., assassinated trying to create what i think to some may be small degree, has been realized in the election and inauguration the first black president of this country. >> well, you know, with the first election, i along with so many other people just broke down and cried and cried and cried. out of thankfulness, out of remembering what we had been through. and thinking about medgar and all those other people who gave their lives and gave so much that we don't even recognize any more. and hopefully, will begin to do that in the very, very near future. >> myrlie evers-williams, we're looking forward to your three minutes, we can't wait. >> so am i. >> so great to see you. >>> so a man who marched alongside martin luther king jr. during the civil rights era, congressman john lewis, he will be here, we will speak to him in just a moment. >> we're going to talk about what this inauguration means for him and also the challen
. that begins at 9:30. the first family urges all americans to help honor dr. martin luther king jr. >> then tomorrow, president obama and vice president biden are officially sworn in for their second terms. the ceremony happens monday. >> crews are still putting together the final preparations for monday's inauguration. we have team coverage starting off with nbc's daniel lee. she's live on the mall with more now. good morning, danielle. >> reporter: good morning. in just hours, thousands of people will be coming to the national mall here. many will be coming to tsee the memoria memorials, but they're also going to a tent that's been put up in honor of the national day of service. the crowds have arrived packed for a party. >> this is one of my bucket list experiences. >> reporter: tiffany grimes thrflew in from atlanta. her first stop was the national mall. >> over 200,000 people sign up nationwide. >> reporter: amelia is attending. she's here from new orleans. like four years ago, president obama has asked people nationwide to join his family and celebrate by serving. this year t
, martin luther king jr. we will pause to remember dr. king's birthday and i'd like to bring in andrew young the third, former civil rights leader and ambassador andrew young. good to see you, sir. >> hey, craig, how are you doing? >> great. your father is a long time friend and confidant of reverend king. what have you learned from your father, and also, his generation as well? >> you know, i think that it is very important that we as americans today give each other a faith-saving way out, and that is one thing that my father was adamant about throughout his life is that when you have an opponent and have indifferences about a subject, that you give your opponent a way out. to keep his dignity and that is how you create change, and that is what dr. king and my father and dr. lowrie and others did during the civil rights movement when they were fighting bigotry. and unfortunately, that is what the president obama is going to to have to learn to do with the go gop. >> what are your thoughts as we get ready to see president obama sworn in for a second time tomorrow? >> i think that it's
in 1997 and president clinton making a reference to dr. king in his speech. >> 34 years ago, the man whose life we celebrate today, spoke to us down there, at the other end of this mall. in words that moved the conscious of a nation. like a profit of old, he told of his dream that one day america will rise up and treat all its citizens as equals before the law and in the heart. dr. martin luther king's dream was the american dream. his quest is our quest. our history has been built on such dreams and labors. and by our dreams and labors we will redeem the promise of america in the 21st century. host: from 1997, to a live view here in washington, d.c. in the area around where the parade will take place following the presidential address. he made that reference to dr. martin luther king and one will expect that the president will make a longer reference tomorrow. guest: i think so. i think tomorrow is historic moment in civil rights history. it was 50 years ago that dr. martin luther king made his "i have a dream" speech on the mall. 50 years ago was the assassination of john f. kennedy , th
: and look for an acknowledgement of dr. martin luther king's vision on the day we honor the civil rights leader, a coincidence of timing that's not lost on the nation's first african american president. now, the speech was finalized over the weekend, but the president often makes final word changes up to the very end, and this time was no exception. i'm told that he made tweaks this morning, in fact. the president, i'm told, will speak for under 20 minutes. by reading prior inaugural addresses, he decided the shorter, the better. his last address was just over 18 minutes. his favorite two past inaugurals were kennedy's, which ran just under 14 minutes, and, of course, lincoln's second, which at 700 words, had to be fewer than ten minutes. i'm told president obama had a quiet breakfast with the first lady and his daughters before going to church. anderson? >> let's talk about it with john king and gloria borger. what are you anticipating, john, hearing today? >> i think broad strokes. time to bring the country together. time to get through the tough economic times. i think it will be a ca
when we think about the fact that this is dr. king's birthday that we're going to be celebrating this weekend. i'm always reminded that he said everybody wants to be first. everybody wants to be a drum maj major, but if you're going to be a drum major, be a drum major for service. be a drum major for justice. be a drum major for looking out for other people. >> nbc's ron mott standing by on the national mall for us today. ron, we just heard from the president there and vice president joe biden and members of his family also participating in the day of service events. since when has all of this been a part of the inauguration festivities? >> reporter: the president when he was inaugurated four years ago made a day of service part of the festivitieses for that first weekend. he wants this to be a standing tradition and hoping future presidents would make this a standard tradition and another way to extend the legacy of dr. reverend martin luther king, jr., who also has a new memorial here in town. thousands of people have gone through this tent today on the national mall for this n
says dr. king focused on people in need. >> he was concerned about and trying to make sure that he really touched the real people, those who had greatest need. and of course there were those who were in poverty and those who were poor and those who had no jobs. >> he has taken dr. king's message to heart. it provides more than one million free meals a year along with affordable housing and health care. >> tomorrow is a holiday so a lot of people will be off and wondering what the weather will be like. >> exactly. leigh glaser will be back. >> it will be terrific. if you look back east at the inauguration festivities. washington, d.c., the expected temperature is 42 degrees. a 30% chance of a few snow showers. it looks high and dry and 52 for dallas and phoenix 75. if you are traveling airbeds -- around the state it will be a mild to almost warm day statewide. southern california is getting up into the 80s. my map is going to come up here in a second. 80 degrees for los angeles. san diego warming to 75. fresno at 64. sacramento 60ly degrees -- 63 degrees. for us here locally tomorro
and evaluation. beis unclear when s released. >>> there were two special services honoring dr. martin luther king, junior. hundreds celebrated the civil rights leader legacy. he lead the congregation and he says dr. king focused on people in need. >> he was concerned about and trying to make sure that he really touched the real people, those who had greatest need. and of course there were those who were in poverty and those who were poor and those who had no jobs. >> he has taken dr. king's message to heart. it provides more than one million free meals a year along with affordable housing and health care. >> tomorrow is a holiday so a lot of people will be off and wondering what the weather will be like. >> exactly. leigh glaser will be back. >> it will be terrific. if you look back east at the inauguration festivities. washington, d.c., the expected temperature is 42 degrees. a 30% chance of a few snow showers. it looks high and dry and 52 for dallas and phoenix 75. if you are traveling airbeds -- around the state it will be a mild to almost warm day statewide. southern california is getting up
martin luther king day. we've been talking so much about the inauguration, we haven't celebrated dr. king's day with as much due as it needed. the president will be using dr. king's personal bible when he's sworn in. >> absolutely. it's outstanding to be here. i don't think there's a better way to celebrate the holiday. a lot of people have been saying this is a dream fulfilled. i feel like it's recognizing the dream in progress and beyond, when you think about it. to be able to have dr. king's presence through his bible and the president to actually continue his mission is one of those things where you just feel like it's the right place at the right time. >> you're a married man with four kids now. >> four? i got two. >> i've got four, sorry. this is like a bad mommy moment. >> you've got two. i've got four. we both have a set of twins. is mariah here with you? will you go to all the parties and the balls tonight? >> i think we'll try to play it as low key as possible. we'll probably be able to stop by a few areas. it's more about being here this morning is the outstanding part. >> it i
in terms and in tones that honored the founders, that honored dr. king, honored the best in the country. and i think in the old way of seeing things, that would be a left thing to do. he is speaking though to the emerging majority in america which is brown, young, which is much more open to the ideas around marriage equality. he is speaking to the america that is rising. i don't think that's left versus right. i think it is right versus wrong in the context of the new majority. >> if i can disagree a little. it seems to me to be left when you say government can't cure society's ills alone. in other words, the center of curing society's ills is always government. on occasion, government needs a little help. no, no, he said that today though. he is being misquoted. >> a critical distinction between the way president reagan stated his philosophy. president reagan and many on the right begin from a premise of negativity. government is the problem, not the solution said president reagan. president obama did not bash business. he did not bash individuals. in fact, he went out of his way to pr
and the other to dr. king. >> it is our generation's task to carry on what those pioneers began? in his inaugural address the president gave vision. >> we are true to our creed when a little girl born into poverty knows she has the same chance to succeed as might be else. >> he touched on taxes, gun control and immigration. he urged cooperation in washington. >> congress requires us to act in our time. >> after the ceremony the president turned to take one last look at the view. later he signed documents nominating his cabinet members. senator majority leader harry reid toasted the president. the president thanked all in attendance. >> i recognize that democracy is not always easy. i recamiers there are profound differences in this room. but i just want to saw thank you for your service. >> the day concluded with a one and a half mile parade to the white house. the president and the first lady walked a portion of the route. tonight they will attend two inaugural balls. >> reporter: talking to some bay area residents told us that seeing him sworn th
't get it at first. then all of a sudden i said it's dr. king's birthday, the day we're going to celebrate. so it's been a wonderful day. i had the opportunity to post a lot of pictures of obama and dr. king on my website and do some things, have conversations with people about the struggle as well as how did -- or how they feel about obama becoming president and how they feel about him winning a second time around. >> what are you hearing? >> people are really, really pleased about that. in washington, d.c. of course, you know, this is a democratic town. we were so happy that the democrats won one more time. so i'm personally real pleased by that. >> one of the things people started to jump to conclusions, we're in a post-racial society right now. and we heard the conversation moving forward we still have a long way to go but he was elected a second time. that has to be another step in the right direction. >> you're absolutely right. at my age, i never thought that i would live to see this. and it has been such a blessing to me to have seen this. the only thing i wish, i kind
coincide this year, but it is no coincidence today that president obama is invoking dr. king's legacy, calling on americans to do something for each other on a national day of service. the president is continuing a tradition he started before his first inauguration. on this national day of service, president obama led by example. he and the first lady volunteered at an elementary school honoring the life and legacy of dr. martin luther king just before -- just as he did before his first inauguration. >> it's a symbol of how our democracy works and how we peacefully transfer power. but it should also be an affirmation that we're all in this together. >> not far away, the vice president and a bunch of bidens helped to pack supply kits for members of the u.s. military. across the country, an estimated quarter million people did something to help someone else. there were clothing drives in manhattan, volunteers added a little life to the walls of a senior center, and as required by the constitution, president obama will take the oath at the white house tomorrow. then again monday in a gra
an elementary school. president obama told the crowd to follow dr. king's advice and help others every chance they get. fplt i am always reminded everybody wants to be first, and everybody wants to be a drum major, but if you are going to be a drum major, be a drum major for service, be a drum major for justice and be a drum major for looking out for other people. >> the national day of service also brought out plenty of celebrities, from former first daughter clinton and other actors led a helping hand. >>> last night, first lady michelle obama and jill biden held a concert. mrs. obama paid tribute to military members and their families. >> when i think about what makes america great, i think about all of you, our men and women in uniform, and our military spouses, and our amazing military kids. >> mrs. obama continued the tradition she started earlier in honoring the military. >> i can't get over her bangs. i really like them. >>> the selected group that will get a very special chance to dance with the lady with the bangs at the inaugural ball tomorrow night. >> and if you are waking up thi
day. it's not just dr. king's birthday celebration, but it's also the 50th anniversary this year of his historic speech during the march on washington, the "i have a dream" speech. and since this president been elected, there is a memorial to dr. martin luther king jr. on the mall. it's not just abraham lincoln or washington or jefferson or roosevelt but also standing nearby martin luther king jr. and it says something for our nation that we're going to create a beloved community, we're going to create a society that is free of racism and bigotry and no one will be left out or left behind. doesn't matter whether you're black or white lashgs tino, asian-american, native american. it doesn't matter where you're straight or gay. dr. king legacy is saying that we are one people, we are one family, we are one house. we make up the american house, the american family. >> amen to that, representative john lewis. thanks for your time. >> thank you. >> in a moment, the big three on how president obama can bridge the political divide in washington. ♪ [ slap! ] [ male announcer ] your fav
with a conversation about dr. martin luther king jr. who preached at the national cathedral four days before he died. and you talked about how he was really giving a wake-up call to the religious to sort of spread the word. how does that story relate to modern times and to what president obama is going to have to do in your perspective, in the next four years. >> well i used it as, with the national cathedral, we're being very supportive of the president's agenda on gun control. and i actually used that as an occasion to talk about dr. king's appearance in that pulpit. about the nonviolence or nonexistence and we had to solve the problem of war and bloodshed. i used it this morning as a rallying cry to ask people in our following to really, get up behind the president. i do think at the time, dr. king was saying that the faith community has to really wake up and not sleep through a revolution, which was his point in 1968. and i think for us in 2013, the issue is how can the faith community be a real voice in public policy and an appropriate way. and i think that is where the conversation at least fo
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 135 (some duplicates have been removed)

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